Thursday, 14 December 2017
News with tag Mars  RSS
Tasmanian tiger was 'doomed by poor DNA' long before it was wiped out by hunting, scientists say

Added: 14.12.2017 6:07 | 0 views | 0 comments


Scientists in Australia have mapped the genetic sequence of the extinct Tasmanian tiger, raising hopes of reviving the species, whose last survivor died in a zoo in the city of Hobart in September 1936. The landmark study of the Tasmanian tiger, or thylacine, was based on examination of DNA from a female pup that had been preserved in ethanol at a museum since 1909. Andrew Pask, a researcher from the University of Melbourne, said that establishing a blueprint of the thylacine’s entire genetic code was the first step in trying to bring back the species through cloning. “As this genome is one of the most complete for an extinct species, it is technically the first step to ‘bringing the thylacine back’,” he said.  “We are still a long way off that possibility. We would need to develop a marsupial model to host the thylacine genome, like work conducted to include mammoth genes in the modern elephant.” Tasmanian tigers became extinct on the Australian mainland about 3,000 years ago but survived on the island state of Tasmania. The species was hunted by European settlers who believed the animals threatened their sheep and who were encouraged by a government bounty of £1 per carcass. Tasmanian tigers or thylacines photographed at Beaumaris Zoo in Hobart in Australia's Tasmania state in 1918 Credit:  AFP / TASMANIAN MUSEUM AND ART GALLERY The last known creature died in captivity in 1936, though the species was not officially declared extinct until 1982. But the genome study revealed that the sandy-coloured marsupial may have become extinct even if humans had not settled in Tasmania. The sequencing found that the thylacine had little genetic diversity, making it harder for it to survive changes in environmental conditions. "They were actually in pretty bad genetic shape and it wasn't because of their isolation on Tasmania. It was a longer-term decline in their history," Dr Pask said. “We certainly made them go extinct — there's no question about that. But we now know even if [thylacines] were still around today they'd probably be in the same genetic dire circumstances as the Tasmanian devil [a local species that is under threat]." The Tasmanian tiger has a somewhat mythical status in Australia and there is still frenzied speculation about whether it may have survived in the wild. There have been regular reported sightings, though most experts believe that the creatures that are spotted are probably feral dogs and that the thylacine is unlikely to have survived. Recent unconfirmed sightings in the state of Queensland prompted a fresh search which has so far proven fruitless. The study found that the genetic health of the thylacine became compromised about 70,000 to 120,000 years ago, an era which coincided with an ice age. The Tasmanian species became  isolated when the island was cut off from the mainland due to rising seas about 14,000 years ago. On the mainland, the species became extinct due to extreme weather and drought, according to a study released earlier this year. Experts said it could take some years – and billions of dollars - to revive the species. "We still have a way to go to get the technology and to get that at a reasonable cost," Christy Hipsley, from Museums Victoria, told Channel Seven. However, Dr Pask said he believed humans have a moral obligation to try to revive the species. "I think we were responsible for hunting [the species] to extinction - in that case, we almost owe it to the species to bring it back," he said. The findings were published in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution.

NASA praises Donald Trump’s ‘NATIONAL EFFORT’ with new US Moon and Mars space initiative

Added: 14.12.2017 4:02 | 0 views | 0 comments

NASA has praised Donald Trump’s “national effort” displayed from his recent Moon and Mars space directive, the institution’s acting administrator has stated.

From: feedproxy.google.com

NFL Network Suspends Marshall Faulk, 2 Others Over Sexual Harassment Claims

Added: 14.12.2017 2:16 | 0 views | 0 comments


A former employee filed a lawsuit

Tags: Sex, NFL, Mars
From: https:

New island offers clues to life on Mars: Nasa

Added: 14.12.2017 0:20 | 0 views | 0 comments

December 14, 2017 3:34 AM
WELLINGTON* The world's newest island - formed during a volcanic eruption in the remote Pacific three years ago - may offer clues to how life potentially developed on Mars, Nasa said yesterday.

Tags: Mars, NASA
From: www.straitstimes.com

Google launches Assistant on Android tablets, more phones

Added: 13.12.2017 20:33 | 0 views | 0 comments

Android tablets running Android 7.0 Nougat and 6.0 Marshmallow will see Google Assistant in the coming weeks.

From: www.zdnet.com

Mars mission sheds light on habitability of distant planets

Added: 13.12.2017 20:26 | 0 views | 0 comments

Insights from NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution, or MAVEN, mission about the loss of the Red Planet's atmosphere can help scientists understand the habitability of rocky planets orbiting other stars.

From: https:

Tasmanian tiger was 'doomed by poor DNA' long before it was wiped out by hunting, scientists say

Added: 13.12.2017 20:09 | 0 views | 0 comments


Scientists in Australia have mapped the genetic sequence of the extinct Tasmanian tiger, raising hopes of reviving the species, whose last survivor died in a zoo in the city of Hobart in September 1936. The landmark study of the Tasmanian tiger, or thylacine, was based on examination of DNA from a female pup that had been preserved in ethanol at a museum since 1909. Andrew Pask, a researcher from the University of Melbourne, said that establishing a blueprint of the thylacine’s entire genetic code was the first step in trying to bring back the species through cloning. “As this genome is one of the most complete for an extinct species, it is technically the first step to ‘bringing the thylacine back’,” he said.  “We are still a long way off that possibility. We would need to develop a marsupial model to host the thylacine genome, like work conducted to include mammoth genes in the modern elephant.” Tasmanian tigers became extinct on the Australian mainland about 3,000 years ago but survived on the island state of Tasmania. The species was hunted by European settlers who believed the animals threatened their sheep and who were encouraged by a government bounty of £1 per carcass. Tasmanian tigers or thylacines photographed at Beaumaris Zoo in Hobart in Australia's Tasmania state in 1918 Credit:  AFP / TASMANIAN MUSEUM AND ART GALLERY The last known creature died in captivity in 1936, though the species was not officially declared extinct until 1982. But the genome study revealed that the sandy-coloured marsupial may have become extinct even if humans had not settled in Tasmania. The sequencing found that the thylacine had little genetic diversity, making it harder for it to survive changes in environmental conditions. "They were actually in pretty bad genetic shape and it wasn't because of their isolation on Tasmania. It was a longer-term decline in their history," Dr Pask said. “We certainly made them go extinct — there's no question about that. But we now know even if [thylacines] were still around today they'd probably be in the same genetic dire circumstances as the Tasmanian devil [a local species that is under threat]." The Tasmanian tiger has a somewhat mythical status in Australia and there is still frenzied speculation about whether it may have survived in the wild. There have been regular reported sightings, though most experts believe that the creatures that are spotted are probably feral dogs and that the thylacine is unlikely to have survived. Recent unconfirmed sightings in the state of Queensland prompted a fresh search which has so far proven fruitless. The study found that the genetic health of the thylacine became compromised about 70,000 to 120,000 years ago, an era which coincided with an ice age. The Tasmanian species became  isolated when the island was cut off from the mainland due to rising seas about 14,000 years ago. On the mainland, the species became extinct due to extreme weather and drought, according to a study released earlier this year. Experts said it could take some years – and billions of dollars - to revive the species. "We still have a way to go to get the technology and to get that at a reasonable cost," Christy Hipsley, from Museums Victoria, told Channel Seven. However, Dr Pask said he believed humans have a moral obligation to try to revive the species. "I think we were responsible for hunting [the species] to extinction - in that case, we almost owe it to the species to bring it back," he said. The findings were published in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution.

Mars mission sheds light on habitability of distant planets

Added: 13.12.2017 17:47 | 1 views | 0 comments

Insights from NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution, or MAVEN, mission about the loss of the Red Planet's atmosphere can help scientists understand the habitability of rocky planets orbiting other stars.

From: https:

RCA Galileo Pro 11.5″ 32GB Tablet with Keyboard Case Android 6.0 (Marshmallow) - $79.98

Added: 13.12.2017 15:45 | 0 views | 0 comments

This RCA Galileo Pro 11.5" 32GB Tablet comes with Keyboard Case. It features Android 6.0 (Marshmallow). ...

Tags: Android, Mars
From: https:

Mars overdue a planet-wide dust storm that could harm the rovers

Added: 13.12.2017 15:40 | 1 views | 0 comments

Mars could have a mega dust storm in 2018. Now we know how the Red Planet's massive storms can cascade into a catastrophe for rovers or future settlers

Tags: Mars
From: https:

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